Gut Bacteria Linked to Anorexia and Eating Disorders

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Eating disorders such as anorexia causes its victims to not experience hunger and satiety in the same way “normal” eaters do. New research demonstrates that the composition of gut bacteria, or the gut microbiome, is linked to anorexia and eating disorders. This is important information as fewer than half of people with eating disorders fully recover — conventional treatments fail many sufferers, the vast majority of them women.

The research demonstrated patients with anorexia had lower gut bacteria diversity than individuals who didn’t have eating disorders. The less diverse the gut microbiome the more depressed and anxious anorexic patients were. The study also discovered that eating again began to restore gut bacteria diversity, which aided in recovery.

The gut microbiome regulates mood, behavior, metabolic function, appetite control, and weight.

Understanding the role of gut bacteria in anorexia can help researchers develop new treatments for anorexia, such as how to reintroduce foods, help support the brain during recovery, and how to use targeted probiotic therapy

Many anorexic patients suffer from gastric and abdominal distress when they reintroduce foods. Targeted probiotic therapy may help with this as well as mental and emotional aspects of recovery.

Gut Bacteria Targeted in Eating Disorders

Past research demonstrates links between gut bacteria and eating disorders, which affect an estimated 5 to 10 percent of the population. A 2015 French study showed the gut microbiome plays a role in eating disorders.

The study observed mice who had an ed by gut bacteriainflammatory reaction to a protein produc.

The mice had an immune reaction to these bacteria, which caused eating disorders in them.

gut bacteria eating disordersThe composition of the gut bacteria that triggered this reaction has a similar molecular structure to a hormone called a-MSH, a satiety hormone that tells you when to feel full. When the immune system attacks the gut bacteria that looks like a-MSH, it also attacks a-MSH since they look the same. The inflammation this causes dysregulates signals around feeding, energy usage, and anxiety.

This is a “cross-reactive” immune reaction — when the immune system confuses the body for a foreign invader. Cross-reactivity commonly causes Hashimoto’s hypothyroidism, type 1 diabetes, or multiple sclerosis.

This is a “cross-reactive” immune reaction — when the immune system confuses the body for a foreign invader. Cross-reactivity commonly causes Hashimoto’s hypothyroidism, type 1 diabetes, or multiple sclerosis.

This is a “cross-reactive” immune reaction — when the immune system confuses the body for a foreign invader. Cross-reactivity commonly causes Hashimoto’s hypothyroidism, type 1 diabetes, or multiple sclerosis.

Eating disorders are complicated and require various types of therapeutic approaches. However, it’s still important to consi

Eating disorders are complicated and require various types of therapeutic approaches. However, it’s still important to consi

Eliminate processed carbs and sugars as they trigger addictive and compulsive tendencies.

Stabilize blood sugar to curb cravings and food obsession. This may requires eating small, frequent meals initially.

Eat plenty of vegetables and a wide diversity of vegetables. This will increase gut microbiome diversity, which in turn facilitates a healthy mental approach to food and the body.

Support your brain chemicals, or neurotransmitters that influence your mood, self-perception, behavior, and energy. For example, you may need serotonin or dopamine support. Serotonin allows us to feel joy and dopamine helps us feel self-worth and motivation, in addition to warding off cravings and obsessiveness. Both play a role in eating disorders.

If you have been starving yourself, binging and purging, undereating, or affecting your diet in other ways due to an eating disorder, it’s strongly possible you may be deficient in either one or both of these neurotransmitters.

Ask my office for more advice on how to support a healthier approach to balanced approach to recovering from eating disorders.

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One of the main goals at RedRiver Health and Wellness Center is to work with patients to improve their health, wellbeing, and quality of life. The RedRiver Health and Wellness Center team is passionate about helping ailing patients achieve optimal health, and we truly care about the success of each and every patient.

RedRiver chiropractic physicians are great advocates for prescribing physicians and endocrinologists. In fact, many of our patients see their prescribing physician(s) more frequently while under our care than they would otherwise. Our goal is not to replace our patients’ primary care physicians and specialists, but to complement their care by providing patients with nutrition, diet, lifestyle and educational support and strategies. This way, patients can learn to manage their symptoms more efficiently. We have developed rewarding relationships with many prescribing physicians across the country, and we strive to continue to building relationships with MDs, DOs, NPs, and NMDs. When health professionals can work together for the benefit of the patient’s health, it becomes a win/win situation for the one who matters most—the patient.

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